Aaron Ekblad: “I want to be on that opening night roster”

As Aaron Ekblad settles into life in South Florida for his big push towards making the Panthers’ roster as an 18-year-old, it should be apparent to Panthers fans that this will be the first time that Ekblad has faced any sort of adversity as a hockey player. This isn’t to say that you can expect any sort of Lindrosian behavior from the Belle River, Ontario native; the honor roll student is touted for his complete game as a defenseman, more than justifying the fact that he is just one of four players to date to have been granted exceptional player status by Hockey Canada.

What strikes you immediately (besides his model-esque appearance) is Ekblad’s ability to walk a tightrope between confidence and meekness. When asked if he had spoken with veteran defenseman Willie Mitchell–a signing I have lauded as a great move by Dale Tallon, not just for the development of Ekblad, but for the progression of the defensive corps as a whole–he said that it “…would be awesome to meet Willie Mitchell,” as if he were hoping the veteran d-man would stop by his locker to extol the virtues of using longer sticks in the NHL.

His performance–to date–is anything but vague. What excited Hockey Canada about the 15-year-old has only matured as he’s grown. Now, the 6’3 216 lbs. blue liner is known for his all-around game, excelling just as much on special teams as he does at even strength. His one-timer is considered lethal, and while he doesn’t do it very often, he’s more than willing to drop the gloves to prove a point. Some have compared his style of play to legendary defenseman Denis Potvin, a favorable comparison that Ekblad takes with a grain of salt. “All comparisons are good, especially to guys who have had storied careers,” Ekblad said, while adding “I want to pave my own path in the NHL.”

With the uncertainty as to what his role will be with the organization next year, Ekblad has a few things going in his favor. For one, the Panthers have only four defensemen locked in as starters (at this point): Erik Gudbranson, Brian Campbell, Willie Mitchell, and Dmitry Kulikov. Another is that he is right-handed, something only one of the four assumed starters (Gudbranson) can boast. Although he’s 18, his two-way game and size should translate well to the NHL, something that naturally keeps 18-year-olds in junior hockey for at least another year or two.

“I want to be on that opening night roster,” Ekblad said. “I want to be given that opportunity and I think if I do, I’ll be able to run with it.”

Along with the natural spark that adding an 18-year-old, former number one overall pick to the fold, is the Panthers much publicized power play woes. Ekblad’s play could easily bolster a unit that shot a comically low 7.6%, while serving to boost the play of Brian Campbell, who could settle into the power play quarterback role, setting up Ekblad’s big one timer.

Aside from Ekblad and Alex Petrovic, who is entering the last year of his entry-level deal, the Panthers have Dylan Olsen and Colby Robak, who would have to clear waivers in order to be sent to the AHL. Additionally, Shane O’Brien was invited to camp, and Greg Zanon was signed to a one year, two-way contract.

Like Vincent Trocheck, it’s the options the Panthers have in Ekblad, and that they can send him back to his junior team, that are stacked against him. With that in mind, Ekblad obviously has nothing else to learn in the OHL, as his 23 goals and 30 assists in 58 games would suggest.

If all Ekblad wants is to clear his own path in the NHL, his route thus far is a pretty good start.

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Tallon uses myriad of methods to build rising D corps

There is an old NHL proverb passed down from generation to generation that dictates the winning formula for a team to embrace and thereby succeed: “Build from the back out.”

It is this mantra that hints at stabilizing your core from the defensive side out when trying to build a winning team that can keep winning for years on end.

Dale Tallon inherited a limping roster when he was hired and has gone through the process to turn it into one of the most promising, young and dynamic groups in the National Hockey League. He stabilized his net when he realized Jacob Markstrom was not cut for full-time duty and is now in the midst of cementing his D corps that will hopefully lead to real success in the short and long-term.

Dale Tallon’s defensive rebuild conforms to many rebuilds we’ve seen in the league over the years with one notable exception. He has used key draft picks to select core players, traded for young undervalued players from other organizations and signed complimentary pieces via free agency. Despite taking the beaten path in those regards there, is one piece that he added that did not conform to the traditional rebuild schematic. The piece that I am referring to is Dale Tallon’s long con….but we’ll get to that.

When you look at the Panthers’ potential defense for the upcoming season you see the results of the aforementioned beaten path which Tallon walked with great effectiveness.

The Key Draft Picks

Dmitry Kulikov, drafted 14th overall in 2009, 99 points in 313 games played after making the team directly out of camp after his draft. The Panthers committed to Kulikov long-term and clearly see him as an integral part of their defensive system.

Kulikov ate minutes for the Panthers finishing 2nd on the team in terms of total minutes played and was deployed almost with complete neutrality between the offensive and defensive zone last season, meaning that the coaching staff believed in him in both offensive and defensive situations.

Within the last two years Kulikov has been on the upward swing possession-wise and has had a positive impact on his team’s performance while on the ice.

Next up: Erik Gudbranson, the Panthers’ esteemed 3rd overall selection from the 2010 entry draft. Erik was thrown into the fire as Kulikov was and has been through the struggles that one would expect a young defenseman to go through while playing in the NHL as an under-20 year old. While Gudbranson’s skill set is elite and the talent is obvious, he is only beginning to carve his niche on the ice as was evident at times last season. Regardless of the past, the future is bright for the likely captain of the Panthers and a serious jump (and I mean serious) in possession metrics suggests that he is coming into his own as planned. At 22 and with the best surrounding cast since his debut, Gudbranson is primed for another season of improvement.

Then there’s the 6’3 216 lbs colt in the room, Aaron Ekblad. The Panthers invested heavily in the defenseman in June and undoubtedly plan to make him a part of their core for as long as they can (aka his entire career). Ekblad’s elite talent is undeniable and his ability to transition that from the junior game to the NHL is obviously paramount for the Panthers’ success in any realm. It’s a risk to select a defenseman first overall due to their slow development and potential for failure but the Panthers clearly thought that he was worth the risk so he will have to make it worth their while.

The undervalued trade target

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure has never been truer when it comes to Dylan Olsen (and his fellow former Blackhawk Jimmy Hayes). Chicago deemed Olsen (and Hayes) expendable to regain the services of Kris Versteeg and I believe I would be hard pressed to find someone who thinks the Panthers got the worse end of the deal from a player perspective. Olsen went from a fringe NHLer in Chicago’s system to a mainstay blue-liner in Florida and managed to put up positive possession numbers for the first time in his career with a weaker line up supporting him. Olsen is poised to keep his spot on the blue line out of training camp and cement his spot in the NHL as a valuable top six defender.

The complimentary free agent

Any good GM knows that free agency is for filling out the roster, not building it. When Dale Tallon went on a spending spree in 2011 he picked up players to fill the roster while his prospects were gaining experience in the minor league and junior ranks. That spree pushed the Panthers into the playoffs but that clearly did not equate to long-term success. Tallon’s youth is finally maturing and he is now at a stage where he can use free agency to go after players he deems suitable for his squad.

Enter Willie Mitchell. Mitchell is the kind of player that GMs love. He’s a winner at all levels winning an ECAC title with Clarkson University, a IIHF World Championship gold medal and of course the two Stanley Cups with the LA Kings in 2012 and 2014. He is a 12 year NHL vet who has made a positive impact on every team he has played for. He is a leader who leads by example and is not afraid to put his body on the line as is evident by his team-leading 128 blocked shots last year. To impress you more, even with Mitchell’s high blocked shot totals he is still a fantastic possession player who creates more positive possession events than he gives up and considering he blocked 128 shots last season that is a lot of positive possession events.

Mitchell will bring a sense of stability to the Panthers defense this season. He will be a solid veteran presence to the young guns both on and off the ice and of course will be relied upon heavily by the coaching staff in key situations when needed.

The long con

Finally, we get to Brian Campbell.

When Brian Campbell was traded to the Florida Panthers on June 25th 2011 the narrative was that of “A cap dump by Chicago to rid themselves of a shell of a player that they thought they were getting to a team he won’t succeed with.”

Not exactly a rousing endorsement for the Panthers, but after finishing last in the Eastern Conference and missing the playoffs for the 10th straight year the pundits didn’t have to be generous to the team in Sunrise. From the Panthers’ perspective it was more than a cap relief favor to the GM’s previous employer, it was the start of the locomotive that was and is Dale Tallon’s rebuild of the Florida Panthers.

NHL GMs think that far ahead and that’s what Dale Tallon was doing when he traded for Campbell. He acquired a piece that would help the team in the short-term and one that would evolve into the cornerstone of his defensive corps in the long-term.

Tallon took it on the chin when he traded for Campbell but he is only reaping the benefits of acquiring a premiere all-around defenseman who can, has and will do it all for the Panthers.

Let’s talk leadership. Brian Campbell epitomizes the word.

I don’t just mean that he is a “leader,” of course he’s a leader. He’s a 35 year old decade plus player with 838 games under his belt. He’s a Stanley Cup Champion, has been a Captain, an alternate captain and is a poised and professional person who deals with fans and media with aplomb. His career speaks for itself in terms of intangibles but I want to talk about the aspects of his game that makes him the cornerstone of the team.

When I said leader I meant “leader” as in team leader in 5 on 5 ice time since he was traded to the Panthers. In fact he led by 288, 220 and 281 minutes within the past 3 seasons, which is insane. He has either led or finished 2nd in shots taken by a defenseman since his Panthers debut and has been among the team leaders (and led in 13-14) in blocked shots. He finished 2nd, 1st and 1st since the 11-12 season in takeaways by a Panthers defenseman. To top it all off, since 2011-2012 Campbell has led all Panthers’ D in points.

Beyond these stats, his possession numbers are exceptional.

He boasts a 52.1% Corsi For Percentage which means that when Campbell is on the ice 52.1% of the total shot attempts are going towards the opposing team’s net. To give you a comparison, that is 38th best among defenseman after the 13-14 season and best on the Panthers by 1.5%, which is astounding. Campbell literally drives possession forward for the Panthers better than any other D by a significant margin.

In terms of Fenwick (shots directed toward the net that aren’t blocked) Campbell clocked a 52.5%, 1% better than the closest Panthers D and good for 39th in the league.

These numbers are even more impressive when you take into account that Campbell played the 3rd most 5 on 5 minutes out of any defenseman in the NHL. To add to his impressive resume his 5 on 5 Zone Start Ratio is 50.8% meaning that he was nearly evenly distributed between the offensive and defensive zone which alludes to my “all-around player” label.

What impresses me most about Campbell’s metrics are his Relative Corsi and Fenwick numbers. He is a +3.0% 5 on 5 Corsi and Fenwick player which means that the team is much better (3% better) at possession when he is part of the 5 man on-ice unit. That is, again, a full percent higher than the next Panthers D which means he is better at making the team better than any other defenseman on the team.

With skating that cuts the ice like a knife does warm butter, a hard and accurate shot with a quick release, a premiere first pass and exceptional defensive skills, Brian Campbell is the whole package for the Panthers. He is the unequivocal cornerstone of a defensive group that has been carefully constructed and perfected over the years. Campbell was brought in with the knowledge that he would one day be this player for the team. He knows what it means to be a Panther, he wears an A and is a strong candidate to wear the C and has been through the absolute worst the franchise has seen. With the team ready to rise up from the bowels of the NHL, Brian Campbell is at the helm.

With less than two months until opening night, the current blue-line for the Panthers is shaping up to be one of the most talented defensive corps the franchise has seen in a long time.

Shawn Thornton: “I never thought I’d play in the NHL, let alone win a Cup.”

On July, 1 2014 F Shawn Thornton shipped out of Boston and set his sights on South Florida, signing a two-year, $2.4 million contract. Thornton has been a well-known enforcer within the NHL for over a decade and has not only a wealth of experience that he’s gained through the years, but two Stanley Cup rings to boot. The 6’2″ 217 lb, bruiser spent seven seasons with the Boston Bruins and his leadership and hard work on and off the ice, as well as his intimidation factor were revered in the city of Boston.

Like in the summer of 2011, Florida Panthers GM Dale Tallon swam a couple of  laps in the Free Agency pool looking for the right pieces to the Florida puzzle during this summer, and made a splash signing six new players, including Thornton. A familiar face for Tallon, Thornton was a part of the Chicago Blackhawks during Tallon’s tenure in the Windy City. Looking for experience and toughness on a young Panthers team, Thornton and Tallon working out a deal seemed like a no-brainer.

“Florida was my first choice.” said Thornton, “I like where the team is going. He (Tallon) was talking about the moves he was going to make in the offseason. I obviously know Dale from Chicago. (We) Love the area. I’ve already been down a couple of times checking it out with the wife, and we’re really excited to be a part of it.”

Thornton, 37 is an elder statesman on a Panthers team whose core players are just reaching, or are barely at legal drinking age yet. The veteran winger knows his role within the team and sees the talent that this team possesses, some of whom he’s taken notice of since playing against them in the past.

“The skill level is obviously second to none. I was actually asking Tuukka (Rask) about (Aleksander) Barkov last year because I didn’t know much about him, but playing against him you definitely notice him. Playing against (Erik) Gudbranson the last couple years, he was extremely hard to play against. I knew every time I went into the corner there was going to be a rough one coming out. These guys are starting to come into their own, their young kids are starting to play the game the right way.”

A humble man, Thornton looks to be an approachable member of the team for the young guys, willing to instill his wisdom whenever need be.

“I never thought I’d play in the NHL, let alone win a Cup. I’m very fortunate where my career has taken me. (Willie) Mitchell and (Dave) Bolland have both won twice. We aren’t going to come into the locker room and say ‘this is how I did it’, ‘this is how I did it’ and ‘this is how I did it’. Kids ask questions, and they’d like to know what it’s about and some things that I may have picked up along the way. Any type of advice and experience I am more than happy to share.”

Off the ice, Thornton created the Shawn Thornton Foundation . Started up in 2013, Thornton’s foundation is dedicated to helping find cures for Parkinson’s disease and cancer. A proponent of a strong community presence, Thornton looks forward to getting involved in South Florida as he has done in the past with his previous teams.

“Everywhere I’ve been, I’ve always tried to embrace the community. I think you get a better feel for people in the area when you’re out and about doing most things. I think we’re very, very fortunate to do what we do for a living. To take an hour out of our day a few times a month to put some smiles on faces is the least we can do.”

The enforcer from Oshawa, Ontario will be continuing his offseason training with a trip on Tuesday to Los Angeles, California where he will work with legendary Boxing Trainer, Freddie Roach. A Six-time Boxing Trainer of the year, Roach has worked with countless boxers including Mike Tyson, Oscar De La Hoya, Bernard Hopkins and Miguel Cotto as well as several Mixed Martial Artists including Anderson Silva, Georges St. Pierre, Tito Ortiz and Jose Aldo.

Although seen as a fighter on the ice, Thornton isn’t training for just fighting, but for the conditioning aspect that Roach instills in his program. Thornton views fights on the ice versus the ring as “a different animal”.

Thornton will bring a much-needed edge to the Panthers this season, and with his willingness to drop the gloves with anyone brave enough to return the favor, he could be a fan favorite in Sunrise just as he was in Boston.

 

 

 

NHL players tweet their goodbyes 2014

With the tumultuous early days of this year’s free agent frenzy now behind us, recently moved players are beginning to adjust to their new organizations as fans still lament their departures. In years past, if a player wished to show their gratitude to a former fan base or organization they were limited to mainly newspapers as their only outlet to express their appreciation. In today’s modern world, however, social media has made it possible for fans and players to be closer than ever in terms of communication.

Although not everyone chooses to participate, many players around the NHL have turned to twitter to help build stronger relationships with fans as well as opening their lives up to the public. It is through this social media revolution that players can now openly express their thanks when their time with a club has expired.

With all of the chaos that comes with free agency, many players have changed area codes within the past week and bid farewell to the organizations they once called home. After scouring twitter for a while, I have compiled a list of farewell tweets from some of the NHL’s recently moved skaters.

Willie Mitchell

[Read more…]

Recapping the Florida Panthers Free Agent Signings

With the Viola-Cifu tandem giving Dale Tallon and the Florida Panthers the green light to spend this offseason, the Panthers kept quite busy during “Free Agent Frenzy” day, announcing six signings on day one.

It’s no secret that the Panthers had a lot of holes in their line up, and they addressed a few of those holes this afternoon with the additions of Jussi Jokinen, Willie Mitchell, Dave Bolland, Derek MacKenzie, Al Montoya and Shawn Thornton.

Jussi Jokinen was the first announced signing of the day, inking a 4-year deal worth $16 million. Though he is listed as a center, Jokinen spent his last 2-years playing wing alongside Evgeni Malkin and James Neal of the Pittsburgh Penguins. As cliché’ as it may sound, adding another Finnish player to the lineup bodes well for 18 year old center center Aleksander Barkov, who played with Jokinen during the 2014 Winter Olympics.

While Jokinen may not be the 50 point player we caught a glimpse of last season, he still has a knack for the net and will be as productive as the centerman guiding him. If slotted with Barkov next year, look for the 2014-2015 version of the “Killer B” line.

After a bidding war between the Panthers and the Toronto Maple Leafs, Dave Bolland decided to take 5 years and $27.5M, and move to Sunrise, Florida. With strong connections to Dale Tallon during their Chicago years and a need for a 3rd line center, this deal for the Panthers seemed inevitable.

Though a nagging back injury and torn Achilles heel have kept Bolland from playing close to a full NHL season in over 3 years, when healthy, Bolland can provide the Panthers with stability up the middle, and can serve as a solid mentor for centers Barkov and Nick Bjugstad. Though Bolland hasn’t been able to provide a whole lot of production the last couple of years, lets hope for the Panthers sake Bolland can get back to the 30+ point player he once was in 2009, 2011, and 2012.

With the 3rd signing of the afternoon, the Panthers inked goaltender Al Montoya to a 2-year contract worth $1.05M AAV. This was one of the better signings for the Panthers, especially after former backup goaltender Dan Ellis struggled to find solidity between the pipes.

Montoya has spent his career as a backup with the New York Islanders and Winnipeg Jets, sporting a career save percentage of .910 and 2.63 goals against average. Montoya saw his most productive season last year, appearing in 28 games with the Winnipeg Jets, recording a .920 save percentage and 2.30 GAA. As of right now, Tallon has Montoya penciled in as his No.2 goalie, with Ellis fighting for a spot.

With the loss of Krys Barch to free agency, the Panthers added former Boston Bruin heavyweight and media favorite, Shawn Thornton. Thornton, 36, is another guy who has history with Tallon during their Chicago days. The 6’2, 217 lbs forward is an imposing player who adds a lot of personality and toughness to the 4th line.

With Vincent Trocheck and Drew Shore’s future with the Panthers still undefined, the Panthers added centerman Derek MacKenzie to their roster. MacKenzie, 33, signed a 3-year deal worth $1.3M AAV. MacKenzie brings physicality, character, and a solid 2-way game to the Panthers roster. Look for MacKenzie to play 4th line minutes between Thornton and Jimmy Hayes next season.

The Panthers went a solid hour without inking a free agent, and it had fans at the edge of their seats. With Matt Niskanen signing a mega deal with the Washington Capitals, that left only one remaining capable defenseman in free agency –Willie Mitchell. Luckily, the Panthers snagged the rugged defenseman, and signed him to a low-risk deal worth $8.5M over 2-years.

While the money may seem a bit steep, Mitchell brings a much-needed element to the Panthers blue-line, as well as 2 Stanley Cups under his belt. Mitchell has been a positive possession player for the past 2 seasons, and plays a monster defensive game. He led all Los Angeles Kings in blocked shots last season with 128, and logs north of 20 minutes playing time per night. With a blueline consisting of Aaron Ekblad, Erik Gudbranson, Dylan Olsen, and Dmitry Kulikov, the addition of Willie Mitchell fills a veteran need with the departures of Ed Jovanovski, Tom Gilbert, and Mike Weaver.

While the Panthers addressed most of their needs this afternoon in Free Agency, there are still a few holes that need to be addressed come the start of the 2014-2015 season.

 

Florida Panthers Sign D Willie Mitchell

The Florida Panthers have announced the signing of D Willie Mitchell on a two-year contract worth $8.5m. Mitchell is a two-time Stanley Cup Champion, both with the Los Angeles Kings (2012, 2014). The 6’3″, 205 lbs. blueliner is not only the first defenseman of the day to be signed by the Panthers, but fits the bill for the veteran defenseman Dale Tallon was looking for.

A young Panthers blueline including Erik Gudbranson, Dmitry Kulikov, Dylan Olsen and the 2014 First Overall Pick, Aaron Ekblad can learn a lot from the 37-year old Mitchell as he will fill the role of the elder statesman that Ed Jovanovski leaves behind. Coming off of a Stanley Cup victory where he was a big part of their backend, Mitchell silenced critics after missing the lockout shortened 2012-13 season following knee surgery. The 2013-14 season for Mitchell was a solid one where the shutdown style defenseman finished with a plus-14 rating and 12 points (1-11-12).

Well known for his leadership qualities, Mitchell brings not only over a decade of experience but also the capability to kill penalties. Mitchell led the Kings with 128 blocked shots and finished fourth in Time on Ice averaging 20:19 per game.

Three Free Agents The Florida Panthers Should Consider

We all know that the Florida Panthers have money to burn this summer in free agency, and the hope is that Dale Tallon will be able to land one, if not two marque players in an effort to bring not only scoring, but respectability to South Florida.  It’s a tall order, and there will be much competition for some of the bigger names out there.  Hopefully the Panthers won’t have to over pay too much for any of the players that they’ve targeted.  Besides making an effort to attract a couple of big names to help fill out the top 6 at forward, and a defenceman or two, there are a few players that are flying below the radar that could instantly help this team.

Mayson Raymond is a player that this site has long been a fan of, and is someone that can make the Panthers better immediately. Raymond who last year was ignored by all 30 NHL teams until the Toronto Maple Leafs scooped him up in September, signing him to a one year deal, could fit in very nicely on either the second, or third line for Florida.  Raymond who tallied 25 goals while playing for the Vancouver Canucks in 2009-2010, and scored 19 for the Leafs last season has obviously shown a goal scoring touch.  His speed makes him a dangerous threat, and his ability to play solid two way hockey makes him useful on special teams.

Raymond earned a paltry million dollars last season, and would likely be looking for a 3 or even 4 year deal at this point in his career. He’ll be 29 in September and is still young enough to fit in with the youth movement here, and also brings some playoff experience as well after seeing post season action with the Canucks.  Dale wouldn’t have to offer the moon, yet if Raymond would consider a deal in the $2.5-$3 million dollar range, he’d be a perfect fit.

Devin Setoguchi is a former 30 goal scorer for the San Jose Sharks who has somehow seen his production dwindle.  Playing with the Sharks, “Gooch” scored 84 goals in three plus seasons, and added 14 more in the playoffs.  Devin isn’t big by any means, but can play a power forward type game, as has to ability to play physical when needed.  He had 143 hits last season in 75 games for the Winnipeg Jets while scoring only 11 goals, but wasn’t seeing much time on the top two lines.  Still, he’s a player who we know can score when given the opportunity, and will add a much needed physical element to a Panther team that has been known to be soft.

I don’t think that Setoguchi would be able to command the $3 million he was paid last season, and should come in at about a million less, still has some game in him at 27 years old, which is when most hockey players are hitting their prime.  He won’t be highly sought after either, and could be another “bargain” for Florida.  His physical presence could be something that’s been missing on the anemic power play, as he could plant himself in the crease.  An attribute that’s been missing since the days of Gary Roberts. 

Willie Mitchell is a 37 year old defenceman, coming off of his 2nd Stanley Cup. Though he doesn’t show a lot of flash, Mitchell has been a key part to the LA Kings success over the past 3 seasons. And on the Panther’s blueline, that’s something that’s sorely needed.  Mitchell has also been very durable throughout most of his career, and would provide fantastic veteran presence to help young defencemen like Erik Gudbranson and Dylan Olsen. He won’t pile up a ton of points, but his physicality and shut-down defensive style is something to be desired in the Panthers dressing room.

While the Panthers wait for players like Ian McCoshen and Joshua Brown to become NHL ready, Mitchell could be around long enough to fill the middle pairing till the kids are NHL ready.

The Panthers will enter the free agent market in July with a lot of work to do, and while many want the “big” name player(s) signed, they’ll also have to fill in the roster with “needs”. Any one or even two of these three players can step in immediately and be significant contributors to the club.

Thanks for reading and we welcome your thoughts in the comments section below!

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Panther Parkway Post-Game: Panthers vs. Kings

Stars of the game

1st: Jonathan Quick (24-24 saves – 1.000 sv%)

2nd: Trevor Lewis (1G-1A-2P)

3rd: Drew Doughty (0G-1A-1P)

Goals (Kings 4, Panthers 0)

LAK: Trevor Lewis (5) Assists: Kyle Clifford, Willie Mitchell

LAK: Mike Richards (10) Assists: Trevor Lewis, Drew Doughty

LAK: Dustin Brown (13) Assists: Jarett Stoll, Dwight King

LAK: Alec Martinez (9) (Powerplay) Assists: Slava Voynov, Jeff Carter

Highlight

Jonathan Quick makes a terrific glove save on Tomas Fleischmann in the 2nd period. Watch Here.

Quote of the game

TBD

Tweet of the game

This guy is smart.

Next Up

The Florida Panthers take on the Anaheim Ducks at the Honda Center, on Sunday at 8:00 p.m.

Tune into FOX Sports Florida to catch all of the action!

Thanks for reading and we welcome your thoughts in the comments section below!

Follow Paige on Twitter @PaigeLewisFL

For All Your Florida Panthers’ Updates Follow Panther Parkway on Facebook

Follow Panther Parkway on Instagram @ PantherParkway

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